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Execute Macro Command

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088701D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Schick, T: AUTHOR

Abstract

Today, processors execute two types of operation sequences each consisting of: 1) Arithmetic and logical operations called instructions, or 2) I/O operations called commands. These operations are not customarily mixed in a single sequence. This article describes a technique which permits arithmetic and logical operations to be performed in the same sequence with I/O command operations without interrupting the driving processor.

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Execute Macro Command

Today, processors execute two types of operation sequences each consisting of: 1) Arithmetic and logical operations called instructions, or

2) I/O operations called commands. These operations are not customarily mixed in a single sequence. This article describes a technique which permits arithmetic and logical operations to be performed in the same sequence with I/O command operations without interrupting the driving processor.

An execute macro operation causes a sequence of instructions, sometimes called a macro, to be executed in line with the I/O command chain. The next I/O command is executed only upon the completion of the macro. The chain may thus continue operation without terminating and without interfering with the control program. The objective of parallelism is furthered with this technique because it allows most communication sequences to be executed nearly self contained.

An example of such a chain is illustrated in the drawing. The executable instructions may be those defined by any processor architecture. Where performance is critical, the architecture should be that of the microprocessor interpreting the I/O command. The data address field of the ALU (arithmetic and logic unit) command points to the first executable instruction of the macro. The last executable instruction of the macro is a type of return instruction which causes the current command to be completed and the next command to be initiated.

The described technique...