Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Vitreous, High Temperature, Film Resistor Material

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088738D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

McCormick, W: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Photoresist materials of both positive and negative variety are deposited upon a substrate and a desired configuration is formed by usual photolithographic techniques. Subsequently, the resist is heated to a temperature of about 1200 degrees C in an atmosphere furnace. An atmosphere of nitrogen or other gases is appropriate. The result is a vitreous carbon material which is relatively inert chemically.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 75% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Vitreous, High Temperature, Film Resistor Material

Photoresist materials of both positive and negative variety are deposited upon a substrate and a desired configuration is formed by usual photolithographic techniques. Subsequently, the resist is heated to a temperature of about 1200 degrees C in an atmosphere furnace. An atmosphere of nitrogen or other gases is appropriate. The result is a vitreous carbon material which is relatively inert chemically.

Conventional photoresist materials, as well as sheet resist, are converted into vitreous carbon. Sapphire, glass and thermally oxidized silicon wafers are useful as substrate materials.

The resists are spin-coated onto the substrates and, for thick films, initial layers are exposed prior to coating with subsequent layers. In this fashion, the thickness of the resist, and the thickness of the subsequent vitreous carbon, can be varied to any particular value, up to 20 micrometers. For thicker vitreous carbon films, sheet resist of several mils thickness (.003-inch, for example) may be laminated onto the substrate and converted into vitreous carbon.

The conversion process produces an adherent vitreous carbon layer on the substrate which is hard, glassy, and of controlled electrical resistance (based on t~e thickness of the previous photoresist layer). The resist can be shaped to any particular pattern before conversion by photolithographic procedures.

The material produced can be used in the following devices:

1) Ther...