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Electrothermic Printing Method and Apparatus Using a Photoconductor and Fusible Ink

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088750D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Aviram, A: AUTHOR

Abstract

Heat transfer printing is a well established technology that uses transfer printing paper. Electrothermic printing devices and ink ribbons are suitable for printing by essentially creating a conductive channel through the ribbon that generates heat, that in turn fluidizes the ink. A new apparatus and method that is suitable for electrothermic printing is described below. The described device has a built-in amplification capability and an easy address mode.

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Electrothermic Printing Method and Apparatus Using a Photoconductor and Fusible Ink

Heat transfer printing is a well established technology that uses transfer printing paper. Electrothermic printing devices and ink ribbons are suitable for printing by essentially creating a conductive channel through the ribbon that generates heat, that in turn fluidizes the ink. A new apparatus and method that is suitable for electrothermic printing is described below. The described device has a built-in amplification capability and an easy address mode.

The method is suitable for several types of printing:

a. low end printing,

b. large volume printing, and

c. document photocopying.

The device, as illustrated in the figure, is comprised of:

a. light source (coherent or noncoherent, light pulses,

arrays, whole images) of a wavelength compatible with the

photoconductor "d",

b. transparent support (optional),

c. transparent electrode,

d. photoconducting layer,

e. second thin electrode,

f. fusible ink,

g. paper to be printed on,

h. applied voltage (gain source), and

i. exposed area.

The operation of the device is as follows: When light strikes an area of the top surface of the device, for example, "i", it activates the photoconductor "d", at which point it becomes conductive and a circuit is closed. A current flow is triggered in the designated area between the two electrodes "c" and "e" in the activated photoconductor. This current is a source of heat that develops in the photocond...