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Vacuum Vapor Silane Priming Process

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088813D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Clark, RJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

It is known that the use of certain trioxysilanes can significantly improve the adhesion of polymers to glass and metals. The critical factors in the degree of achieved improvement are the uniformity and the thinness of the resulting film, the prevention of the corrosion on the adherend surfaces, and the chemical compatibility of the process between the adherend, coupling agent and the adherents. Likewise, the rate of deposition is faster when a vacuum vapor priming technique is used in lieu of the conventional boiling vapor and/or solution priming process.

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Vacuum Vapor Silane Priming Process

It is known that the use of certain trioxysilanes can significantly improve the adhesion of polymers to glass and metals. The critical factors in the degree of achieved improvement are the uniformity and the thinness of the resulting film, the prevention of the corrosion on the adherend surfaces, and the chemical compatibility of the process between the adherend, coupling agent and the adherents. Likewise, the rate of deposition is faster when a vacuum vapor priming technique is used in lieu of the conventional boiling vapor and/or solution priming process.

The chemical compatibility of the process is essential for the achievement of the superior adhesion of polyimides. In current processes, both the silane [gamma-amino propyltriethoxysilane] and the polyimide prepolymer (polyamic acid) are quite sensitive to the adsorption moisture. This adsorbed moisture causes unwanted competitive chemical reactions which interfere with the primary purpose of the silane primer which is to couple with oxide structures on a substrate surface and to crosslink with the carboxylic acid groups of the polyamic acid. Likewise, the adsorbed moisture in the polyimide prepolymer engages in a hydrolysis reaction, causing a reversion of the polyamic acid structure to the hydrated prepolymer precursor. In this form, the imidization process is delayed, and a partial blockage of the complete imidization is the final result. The vacuum vapor silane deposition process is as follows. 1) Place a 25-gram charge of silane into a vaporizer chamber together with the su...