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Steam and Water Spray Wafer Cleaning

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088815D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Deighton, GA: AUTHOR

Abstract

The presence of foreign material on semiconductor wafers presents a serious problem to the manufacture of integrated circuits. Wafer cleaning processes, such as brush cleaning, have been successful in the early process stages of device manufacture when semiconductor wafer surfaces are substantially planar. As processing continues, various steps alter the surface of the wafer to produce surface topology difficult to clean. The subject wafer cleaning technique provides effective wafer surface cleaning at all process levels for both front and back sides of wafers.

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Steam and Water Spray Wafer Cleaning

The presence of foreign material on semiconductor wafers presents a serious problem to the manufacture of integrated circuits.

Wafer cleaning processes, such as brush cleaning, have been successful in the early process stages of device manufacture when semiconductor wafer surfaces are substantially planar. As processing continues, various steps alter the surface of the wafer to produce surface topology difficult to clean. The subject wafer cleaning technique provides effective wafer surface cleaning at all process levels for both front and back sides of wafers.

This steam and water spray wafer cleaning technique utilizes a continuous, rotating wafer transport, such as that manufactured by Hamco, Inc. of Rochester, N.Y., designated as an in-line wafer cleaner. The transport comprises two grooved belts that run in opposite directions at different speeds. Wafers are mounted in the grooved belts and travel vertically through the transport, rotating about a horizontal axis.

Mounted along the transport path are three separate process stations. The wafers first pass through a saturated steam/surfactant wash station, then through a deionized water rinse station and, finally, through an air-knife drying station.

In the steam wash station, steam from a steam generator at about 150 Degrees C and 4.2 kilograms per square centimeter pressure is mixed with water and about 20 cc/min. of a 3% solution of a surfactant. This steam mixture is sp...