Browse Prior Art Database

Seals for Helium Gas

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088853D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gregor, LV: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Shown is a seal for the containment of helium gas within containers, inclusive of adaptation thereof in the use of cooled semiconductor modules (e.g., electronic package), where the chamber is defined by a capped ceramic substrate on which devices are mounted.

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Seals for Helium Gas

Shown is a seal for the containment of helium gas within containers, inclusive of adaptation thereof in the use of cooled semiconductor modules (e.g., electronic package), where the chamber is defined by a capped ceramic substrate on which devices are mounted.

Such an electronic package requires that helium gas be kept within the module for extended periods without appreciable air leaking in, while employing a readily reworkable seal.

Heretofore, conventional demountable mechanical seals have been found to be unreliable, expensive and cumbersome to rework. Also, polymeric O-rings have been found to be permeable to helium, although they do afford easy rework and are inexpensive. The seal shown describes a combination seal of metal and polymer which combines the advantages of both materials.

The seal comprises mating tongue and groove configurations in a flange 1 of a metal module cover 2 and in a metal flange extension 3 of a ceramic substrate
4. The metals may be steel, copper or other appropriate metal which is impermeable to helium.

In the arrangement shown, the tongue portions 5 of the bottom flange 3 are of truncated sloped configuration for spaced mating within the grooves 6 of the upper flange 1. An illustrative dimensional relationship is shown in Fig. 3.

The bottom flange (inclusive of tongue and grooves) is coated with a layer (e.g., about 0.005'') of an elastomeric polymer, such as polyurethane or polyvinylidene chloride. When the t...