Browse Prior Art Database

Gas Velocity Detector

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088879D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Salacka, FS: AUTHOR

Abstract

In gas panel fabrication, it is sometimes necessary to check the velocity and direction of the gas, such as air or oxygen, introduced into the furnace at an elevated temperature, since it is necessary to have the work and gas flow in opposite directions so the impurities developed in the furnace will be carried out and not deposited on the glass surface of the panels. Low velocity gas sensors adapted to operate at elevated temperatures are not commercially available. The apparatus for detecting the direction and velocity of gas flow at elevated temperatures without internal muffle sensors operates as follows:

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Gas Velocity Detector

In gas panel fabrication, it is sometimes necessary to check the velocity and direction of the gas, such as air or oxygen, introduced into the furnace at an elevated temperature, since it is necessary to have the work and gas flow in opposite directions so the impurities developed in the furnace will be carried out and not deposited on the glass surface of the panels. Low velocity gas sensors adapted to operate at elevated temperatures are not commercially available. The apparatus for detecting the direction and velocity of gas flow at elevated temperatures without internal muffle sensors operates as follows:

Referring to the drawing, a longitudinal cross section of a furnace muffle 11 has a number of exhaust ports 13, each port being connected to the tubulation of a sensor selector switch 15. A trace gas from a high pressure tank 17 is introduced into the furnace muffle, where it is mixed with the normal atmosphere control system from port 19. The direction of gas flow, as shown, is opposite to the direction of product flow. The trace gas, such as helium, exits with the furnace gas through exhaust port 13, and is detected by conventional equipment, such as a mass spectrometer 21. When the trace gas exits the muffle, the direction of the gas flow is confirmed, the velocity of the gas flow can be calculated by knowing the elapsed time to travel muffle distances, and the dispersion of trace gas over different sample points within the muffle ca...