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Pulse Pneumatic Circuit Power Reducers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088893D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Horstman, JAW: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A pneumatic circuit which is powered by a pressure pulse provided by a pump is very inefficient because little power is required by the pneumatic circuit, but during the pressure pulse a large amount of energy is stored in the pressurized air and in the compression of the spring in, for example, a pressure regulator or other storage device. At the termination of the pressure pulse, the stored energy is typically wasted or dissipated into friction and acoustic noise and is unavailable for the succeeding pressure pulse. The power required to provide the pressure pulse that drives the pneumatic circuit is therefore much greater than necessary.

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Pulse Pneumatic Circuit Power Reducers

A pneumatic circuit which is powered by a pressure pulse provided by a pump is very inefficient because little power is required by the pneumatic circuit, but during the pressure pulse a large amount of energy is stored in the pressurized air and in the compression of the spring in, for example, a pressure regulator or other storage device. At the termination of the pressure pulse, the stored energy is typically wasted or dissipated into friction and acoustic noise and is unavailable for the succeeding pressure pulse. The power required to provide the pressure pulse that drives the pneumatic circuit is therefore much greater than necessary.

As shown in the drawing, a technique is illustrated for retrieving stored energy in the pressure pulse so that the energy is available for creating the next succeeding pressure pulse, thereby reducing power requirements for the circuit. The energy retrieval device comprises a spring 10 which drives, in the illustrated instance, linkage 11 capable of storing the potential energy of the pressure pulse.

As illustrated in the drawing, a pneumatic pump 12 includes a piston 13 and associated connecting rod 14 which drives the piston towards the pneumatic outlet 16, thereby creating the necessary pressure pulse for a pneumatic circuit (not shown). By connecting a cam 17 to the connecting rod 14, which is shaped so that the force from the compression spring 10 counters the force from pressure in...