Browse Prior Art Database

Fiber Optic Switch

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088910D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Conrad, FL: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

In some applications of fiber-optic light transmission systems, there is the need for the equivalent of a double-throw/double-pole switch. Shown in the drawing is a switch 4 which provides such functions. Switch 4 comprises two cylindrical members 5 and 6, which are opaque and preferably of metal or plastic. Members 5 and 6 have axial bores therethrough, the bore in member 6 being threaded to receive the threaded end of a rod 7. The interior of the bore through member 5 is smooth and slightly larger than rod 7 so that member 5 is free to slide along the rod and rotate relative thereto. A compression spring surrounds a portion of rod 7, and bears against the adjacent surface of member 5 and of a head 9 that is screwed onto the end of rod 7.

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Fiber Optic Switch

In some applications of fiber-optic light transmission systems, there is the need for the equivalent of a double-throw/double-pole switch. Shown in the drawing is a switch 4 which provides such functions. Switch 4 comprises two cylindrical members 5 and 6, which are opaque and preferably of metal or plastic.

Members 5 and 6 have axial bores therethrough, the bore in member 6 being threaded to receive the threaded end of a rod 7. The interior of the bore through member 5 is smooth and slightly larger than rod 7 so that member 5 is free to slide along the rod and rotate relative thereto. A compression spring surrounds a portion of rod 7, and bears against the adjacent surface of member 5 and of a head 9 that is screwed onto the end of rod 7. By adjusting or turning head 9 relative to rod 7, the degree of bias of spring 8 can be changed.

Member 5 has two longitudinal bores 10a and 10b, and member 6 has four longitudinal bores 11a - 11d adapted to receive the ferruled ends of fiber-optic bundles 12, whereby, as best seen in Fig. 3, light is able to be transmitted between the bundles in which the bores, in which they are received, are aligned between members 5 and 6. Member 5 carries a detent pin 13 press-fitted into it. Member 6 has two detent bores 14a and 14b radially displaced 90 Degrees from each other.

In operation, detent 13 is normally engaged with either detent bore 14a or 14b. When engaged in bore 14b, as shown in Fig. 3, bore 10a is align...