Browse Prior Art Database

Adjustable Force and Tolerance Compensating Actuator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088912D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Meeker, RG: AUTHOR

Abstract

Inserting the pins 10 of a product into test equipment zero-insertion-force sockets 12 requires the socket contacts 14, 16 to be separated to accept the I/O pins 10 of the product at the worst case tolerance. With tolerances at or near their maximum, contacting reliability decreases with a fixed actuator deflection system. Referring to the example in Fig. 1, it can be seen that a fixed actuator deflection system moves the contact 14 against an I/O pin 10, and the forces are not equal on each side of the I/O pin, thereby possibly bending the pins. Also, one side of the contact 14, 16 may not deflect enough to make contact with the I/O pins. This puts the entire current load on one contact arm only, for example, contact 14.

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Adjustable Force and Tolerance Compensating Actuator

Inserting the pins 10 of a product into test equipment zero-insertion-force sockets 12 requires the socket contacts 14, 16 to be separated to accept the I/O pins 10 of the product at the worst case tolerance. With tolerances at or near their maximum, contacting reliability decreases with a fixed actuator deflection system. Referring to the example in Fig. 1, it can be seen that a fixed actuator deflection system moves the contact 14 against an I/O pin 10, and the forces are not equal on each side of the I/O pin, thereby possibly bending the pins. Also, one side of the contact 14, 16 may not deflect enough to make contact with the I/O pins. This puts the entire current load on one contact arm only, for example, contact 14.

These problems can be overcome by providing an actuator plate assembly 18 (Fig. 2) which is free to float in the direction of actuation. The contacts 14, 16 will deflect an unspecified distance until a predetermined average force on the actuator plate assembly 18 causes a slip clutch 20 to operate. This prevents further deflection of the contact assembly 14, 16. The actuator arrangement 18 minimizes the probability of large resultant contact forces on I/O pins 10 and increases the probability of both contact arms 14, 16 making good electrical contact. With the actuator plates 22 and 24 allowed to float in the direction of actuation only, it is possible for the center of the actuating eccentric...