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IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088948D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 68K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Moffitt, JS: AUTHOR

Abstract

A powered document stacker in which sheets are stacked on end is shown. Prior stackers have been angled downward below the angle of repose of the stacked sheets so that the stack moves by gravity and is restrained from moving by a controlled escapement.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 68% of the total text.

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A powered document stacker in which sheets are stacked on end is shown. Prior stackers have been angled downward below the angle of repose of the stacked sheets so that the stack moves by gravity and is restrained from moving by a controlled escapement.

The document stacker shown in the drawing has a stacker bed angle above the angle of repose of the sheet stack. The stacker accepts a sheet 9 which passes through sensing means 2 which is connected by wires 3 to control means
4. Backstop 5 is engaged to double-sided continuous toothed belt 7 by means of sprocket 6. Belt 7 is supported on stacker bed 11. Sprocket 6 is free to turn only in the direction indicated by the arrow and thus backstop 5 is free to move to the right due to force from negator spring 8 should a portion of stack 10 be removed.

Sprocket 12 is engaged to toothed belt 7. Sprocket 12 is free to turn on its shaft 13 only in the direction indicated by the arrow, thereby allowing an operator to manually pull the backstop 5 and stack 10 back to clear a jam or for other reasons. Shaft 13 is driven in the direction shown (counterclockwise) by belt 14 and motor 15. Motor 15 is coupled to motor control 17 which is connected to control means 4.

During operation of the stacker, control means 4 issues periodic commands to motor control 17 which causes motor 15 to turn shaft 13 a fixed increment, such that belt 7 advances a small distance, for example, a tenth of an inch, moving sprock...