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High Sensitivity Multipurpose Sensor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088950D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 25K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Burland, DM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A remote sensing device with high sensitivity can be used to measure temperature, electric field, magnetic field, strain, as well as other parameters. The sensor utilizes the phenomenon of spectral self-reversal to measure the frequency shift in materials which emit light and whose frequency is shifted by an external field.

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High Sensitivity Multipurpose Sensor

A remote sensing device with high sensitivity can be used to measure temperature, electric field, magnetic field, strain, as well as other parameters. The sensor utilizes the phenomenon of spectral self-reversal to measure the frequency shift in materials which emit light and whose frequency is shifted by an external field.

As shown schematically in the figure, the sensing device consists of an emitter 10 which is placed in the field 12 to be measured and an absorber 16 which is outside the field. The emitter and absorber will normally be the same material, for example, ruby. This field shifts the emitter frequency slightly from that of the resonant absorber 16. The emitter 10 is excited by, for example, a laser beam 14. The light given off when the emitter 10 is excited is passed through the absorber 16. The intensity of the transmitted light is then monitored by a detector 18.

The shift in emitter frequency gives rise to an asymmetric double peaked structure in the transmitted light. This asymmetry is very sensitive to small frequency shifts between the emitter 10 and absorber 16. This sensitivity permits shifts of 1% of the linewidth or smaller to be measured. Spectral shifts, being proportional to the field, thus then provide an accurate means of measuring the field.

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