Browse Prior Art Database

Disk Type Record Storage Apparatus

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089005D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ottesen, HH: AUTHOR

Abstract

In a hierarchical store of the rotating disk type, the buffer or forward store may consist of one or more rigid storage disks, while the backing or secondary store may consist of one or more flexible disks. In such a hierarchy, latency times can cause random delays in accessing data and in transferring data signals between the primary and secondary stores.

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Disk Type Record Storage Apparatus

In a hierarchical store of the rotating disk type, the buffer or forward store may consist of one or more rigid storage disks, while the backing or secondary store may consist of one or more flexible disks. In such a hierarchy, latency times can cause random delays in accessing data and in transferring data signals between the primary and secondary stores.

Since rigid record storage disk assemblies enable higher recording density and, hence, enhanced access time with respect to most flexible disk storage assemblies, the use of a rigid storage disk as an intermediate buffer for a flexible storage disk has certain economic advantages. However, if the rigid and flexible disks are separately powered and rotated asynchronously, latency times, as well as differing rotational speeds, detract from accessibility to the data for achieving mechanical synchronism between the primary and secondary disk storage apparatus.

A single shaft mounts both disk assemblies, with a single motor powering the composite. Separate actuators for the assemblies provide independent accessing in a buffering operation. Signals taken from the flexible disk assembly are supplied to the rigid disk assembly in a synchronous manner with minimum buffering. All the buffering that is required is determined by the transfer delays inherent in the circuitry. As such, the circumferential location of the data will process. Such a precession can be controlled and limited to...