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Chromium Films

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089094D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jerzak, PC: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

An improved method of vacuum deposition of chromium films upon glass substrates is described, which is particularly adapted for the fabrication of glass display panels. In the usual vacuum deposition processes for depositing chromium, various problems occur. For example, pinholes are formed, poor adhesion of the chromium film is experienced, and high tensile stress builds up in the film which results in cracking. These problems have been found to be particularly critical where a fine grain size (for example, in the order of .038 micrometers) chromium material is utilized in the source melt.

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Chromium Films

An improved method of vacuum deposition of chromium films upon glass substrates is described, which is particularly adapted for the fabrication of glass display panels. In the usual vacuum deposition processes for depositing chromium, various problems occur. For example, pinholes are formed, poor adhesion of the chromium film is experienced, and high tensile stress builds up in the film which results in cracking. These problems have been found to be particularly critical where a fine grain size (for example, in the order of .038 micrometers) chromium material is utilized in the source melt.

This improved method eliminates stress build-ups in the film to a large extent through the use of a larger grain size source material. For example, chromium grains in the order of 2 mm to 20 mm utilized in the source melt result in a significant reduction in stress, apparently due to the smaller surface area of the chromium grains which is available for oxidation. The use of larger size chromium grains is convenient in continuous vacuum deposition processes, as well as in interrupted modes of evaporation.

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