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Converter for Testing Semiconductor Circuits of Different Technologies

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089117D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 3 page(s) / 87K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Koederitz, F: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

In order to permit a computer-controlled tester for semiconductor circuits to be universally employed, i.e. for testing test objects of different semiconductor technologies and thus having different operating voltages and signal levels, a converter 2 is provided between tester 1 and test object 3. Because of the required short connecting lines leading to the test object, the converter is arranged outside the tester.

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Converter for Testing Semiconductor Circuits of Different Technologies

In order to permit a computer-controlled tester for semiconductor circuits to be universally employed, i.e. for testing test objects of different semiconductor technologies and thus having different operating voltages and signal levels, a converter 2 is provided between tester 1 and test object 3. Because of the required short connecting lines leading to the test object, the converter is arranged outside the tester.

For each of the n terminals of the test object, which form its inputs and outputs, a circuit board 4 is provided. The latter comprises a storage part 5 for storing data on the technology of the test object, the necessary terminators and preloads, and data on which terminals of the test object are inputs and outputs, respectively. For each technology the circuit board also comprises driver circuits 6, 7 which are selected by the storage part and which receive the test data via a line group 8 leading parallely up to all of the n circuit boards. Finally, each circuit board is provided with preloads 9, 10 for each technology, as well as with a level detector 11 common to all technologies. Level detector 11 receives the test results, applying them after amplification to the tester, whence they are transmitted to the computer.

Via a second line group 12 the circuit boards receive control data. This line group is used for several purposes. This is rendered possible by control information accompanying the data and sequentially instructing the converter to service each terminal of the test object in accordance with its technology, the association of the input and output terminals, and the load resistor. The processing of the control data pattern and the control information is effected by the program of the computer controlling the tester.

This principle permits separate cycles to be introduced by prog...