Browse Prior Art Database

Label Detection Using Double Light Transmission

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089143D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cato, RT: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Gummed-back bulk labels are very often mounted on a rolled carrier. The labels are easily released from the carrier and later affixed to a variety of objects. The labels are spaced from each other on the carrier by a somewhat variable distance. The variation presents a problem when the labels and carrier are inserted in an automatic printer for printing indicia or data on the labels. The variations in spacing prevent effective preprogrammed line spacing to be used for uniformly printing indicia on the labels.

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Label Detection Using Double Light Transmission

Gummed-back bulk labels are very often mounted on a rolled carrier. The labels are easily released from the carrier and later affixed to a variety of objects. The labels are spaced from each other on the carrier by a somewhat variable distance. The variation presents a problem when the labels and carrier are inserted in an automatic printer for printing indicia or data on the labels. The variations in spacing prevent effective preprogrammed line spacing to be used for uniformly printing indicia on the labels.

One solution used for overcoming the drawback is to advance the carrier until a label edge is detected, and then execute the printing program. After the program is completed, the carrier is advanced until the next label edge is detected. This solution, in addition to providing precise registration, eliminates printing on the carrier when a label is missing. Typically, a light source is positioned on one side of the carrier and a photodetector on the other. The photodetector output is modulated by the labels and the leading edge can be detected when the photodetector output falls.

This article describes an arrangement which is structurally easier to build and which provides improved performance. Fig. 1 illustrates a carrier 10 with labels 11 mounted thereon. The detection mechanism (Fig. 2) includes a light source 12 and photodetector 14 mounted on one side of the carrier. A light pipe 15, formed in a U shape, i...