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Codepositing Alloy Films

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089170D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 19K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Entner, MA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In the figure, a wire mesh or screen target 10 of a pure metal, such as Co or Fe, as a "simple alloy" is fabricated and attached to a conventional sputtering target 11, composed of SiFe, LaB or NiFe, for example attached to holder 12.

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Codepositing Alloy Films

In the figure, a wire mesh or screen target 10 of a pure metal, such as Co or Fe, as a "simple alloy" is fabricated and attached to a conventional sputtering target 11, composed of SiFe, LaB or NiFe, for example attached to holder 12.

The target material and screen material are codeposited to form a film of a given composition based upon the size of the wire and the mesh. For example, with a LaB(6) target 11 and a pure iron wire mesh 10, an alloy of (Fe) (LaB(6))(y) is deposited. The amount of iron (x) can be varied by fabricating mesh targets 10 with wires (either round or flat) or different diameters and mesh sizes.

Amorphous magnetic films can also be prepared in this fashion. Amorphous magnetic materials have a "difficult to sputter" component or components, such as boron and phosphorus. This technique is useful in developing an exact composition of films which produce good magnetic properties. Of course, films produced by this technique are either amorphous or crystalline, depending upon other process considerations, such as cooling.

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