Browse Prior Art Database

Noncopying Computer Architecture

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089192D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Belady, LA: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article discloses a new computer architecture designed to create simpler, more reliable and secure systems by strict control of internal reproduction of data. In such architecture, all memory cells are tagged by a bit which indicates empty or full, and the processor includes two status flags E and F which indicates an attempt at fetching an empty memory cell and an attempt at storing in a full cell, respectively. A new set of instructions is defined as "store a copy" and creates data objects or additional copies in memory.

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Noncopying Computer Architecture

This article discloses a new computer architecture designed to create simpler, more reliable and secure systems by strict control of internal reproduction of data. In such architecture, all memory cells are tagged by a bit which indicates empty or full, and the processor includes two status flags E and F which indicates an attempt at fetching an empty memory cell and an attempt at storing in a full cell, respectively. A new set of instructions is defined as "store a copy" and creates data objects or additional copies in memory.

The following hardware features are necessary for implementation of the new architecture: 1. All memory cells (such as words) are tagged by a bit. Bit "on" means empty; bit "off" means full. 2. The processor (CPU) must have the two new status flags: E and F. E is set if a fetch operation to an empty memory cell is attempted, while F is set at the time of an attempted store operation into a full cell. Under these conditions, the operations will not be executed (become NOPs), while E and F are program-resettable. 3. All general registers of the processor(s) are tagged similarly to memory cells. Overwriting (reading) into a full register is, however, possible, but a new flag in the processor is set, and the offending register identified. 4. A new instruction "clear register" has the meaning of "make empty." Storing the content of an empty register makes the addressed memory cell unconditionally empty. This is...