Browse Prior Art Database

Sintered Metal Lapping Puck

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089208D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brower, RD: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Magnetic cores are mounted on lapping pucks with hot melted wax or resin to lap them to final dimension. Technology demands that the bond line holding the core to the puck must be thin in order to control the dimensions of core thickness and parallelism of the outer edges. To obtain a thin bondline, relief grooves are machined into a lapping puck (Fig. 1A) so that the mounting (MTG) surface is wiped clean of adhesive while the grooves remain full to bond the cores.

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Sintered Metal Lapping Puck

Magnetic cores are mounted on lapping pucks with hot melted wax or resin to lap them to final dimension. Technology demands that the bond line holding the core to the puck must be thin in order to control the dimensions of core thickness and parallelism of the outer edges. To obtain a thin bondline, relief grooves are machined into a lapping puck (Fig. 1A) so that the mounting (MTG) surface is wiped clean of adhesive while the grooves remain full to bond the cores.

As core thickness becomes increasingly smaller, the above method is less practical because it does not adequately support the cores and, as a result, the incident of breakage increases. Fig. 1B shows a solid puck without grooves. When this type of puck is used, the bondline cannot be made small enough for dimensional control of the core and still be strong enough to hold the parts.

Fig. 2 depicts a lapping puck in which the bond surface is fabricated from sintered metal. The bond surface is porous enough to maintain enough adhesive for supporting the core adequately and, also, to maintain a thin bondline.

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