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Crossed Bar Activator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089265D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 3 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gergaud, F: AUTHOR

Abstract

The purpose of the present activator is to control the displacement of a selected moving body between a rest position and an operating position in which the body activates a switch upon appropriate displacement of the corresponding X-Y bars of a crossed-bar arrangement.

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Crossed Bar Activator

The purpose of the present activator is to control the displacement of a selected moving body between a rest position and an operating position in which the body activates a switch upon appropriate displacement of the corresponding X-Y bars of a crossed-bar arrangement.

The subject activator is essentially composed of a plurality of parallel X-bars extending in a first plane and a plurality of Y-bars, perpendicular to the X-bars and extending in a second plane parallel and adjacent to the first one.

The X-bars and Y-bars include regularly spaced notches. At rest, in each X- bar notch is placed a small cylindrical rod, the diameter of which is substantially equal to the width of the notch. These rods extend perpendicularly to the planes of the bars. Both ends of each rod engage an L-shaped groove carved in the top and bottom parts, respectively, of the frame of the assembly.

Fig. 1 represents a crosspoint, i.e., the intersection between an X-bar and an Y-bar, showing two notches (one per bar) 11 and one rod 13.

Fig. 2 represents the configuration of a groove 14 in which the rod moves, showing the successive positions a, b and c that the rod will have upon an appropriate sequence of displacement of the bars, which will be described below.

At the rest position, the bars are as shown in Fig. 1, and the rod is at position


a.

Fig. 3A to 3F show the various steps which allow a given rod to be brought from the rest position a to the operating position c, and vice versa.

In these figures, as well as in Fig. 1, the Y-bar has been hatched in order to make a clearer distinction between the bars.

Moving rod 13 from the rest position a to the operating position c is obtained through the following sequence of operations.

Step 1. The Y-bar is moved (arrow 1) until it reaches the position shown in Fig. 3A. Rod 13 remains in position a.

Step 2. The X-bar is moved (arrow 2) until it...