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Infrared Sensitive Paper for Printing with GaAs Laser

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089400D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Aviram, A: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The availability of photocopying machines in the modern office permits a new approach to the design of the office typewriter. This new approach is best illustrated by the advent of the ink jet typewriter, a sophisticated, fast, quiet, machine that, despite its drawback of single copy printing, is favorably accepted in the market place.

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Infrared Sensitive Paper for Printing with GaAs Laser

The availability of photocopying machines in the modern office permits a new approach to the design of the office typewriter.

This new approach is best illustrated by the advent of the ink jet typewriter, a sophisticated, fast, quiet, machine that, despite its drawback of single copy printing, is favorably accepted in the market place.

If speedy and noiseless typewriters are preferable in the modern office, than there seem to be other technologies capable of delivery of the same (or better) product than that which the ink jet turns out, at a faster and in a less expensive way. Such a typewriter would utilize a specially treated paper sensitive to nonvisible light (preferably infrared (IR) GaAs lasers).

A treated paper that is stable to visible light has been discovered. When exposed to IR 9000 Angstroms +/- 1000 Angstroms, it develops a dark blue (or black) color. This paper is suitable for a typewriter that employs GaAs lasers for beam address character formation.

The paper was obtained as follows: Commercial "heat sensitive paper" (for example, NCR #15 style 2/3 or #15 T 1351), not sensitive to actinic radiation, was coated by dipping in a solution containing an IR absorbing 8000 Angstroms - 9000 Angstroms invisible dye. This dye was (R(3)):

When the paper was exposed to IR radiation, it turned color instantly. Areas that were not treated showed no sensitivity. Other dyes suitable for the coating are:

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