Browse Prior Art Database

Hardware Modeling of LSI Logic Using Microprocessors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089512D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Salyer, G: AUTHOR

Abstract

Digital machines, such as processors, channels and adapters, that use custom large-scale integration (LSI) logic modules require very extensive design verification prior to manufacturing the actual hardware. Current verification schemes fall into one of two general concepts. The first is referred to as hardware modeling. The other verification method is referred to as software modeling.

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Hardware Modeling of LSI Logic Using Microprocessors

Digital machines, such as processors, channels and adapters, that use custom large-scale integration (LSI) logic modules require very extensive design verification prior to manufacturing the actual hardware. Current verification schemes fall into one of two general concepts. The first is referred to as hardware modeling. The other verification method is referred to as software modeling.

The model card method of modeling to be described combines aspects of both software and hardware modeling schemes into a single structure with the potential of verifying larger machines at significantly lower cost and in shorter time than existing methods. As in software schemes, the model is easy to build and can test circuit delays associated with the LSI technology. As in hardware schemes, the model test is highly interactive and can be used to patch errors in an LSI prototype machine. In the scheme shown in the figure, the model card is built consisting of: 1. A microprocessor module 1 containing registers, an ALU and a control structure. 2. Read-Only Memory (ROM) 2 containing a set of instructions to control the microprocessor. 3. Random-Access Memory 3 for program workspace. 4. Input and Output latches (commonly known as PIA ports) 4 connected to card I/O connections. 5. Eraseable Programmable Read Only Memory (EPROM) 5.

The EPROMs are personalized to describe the LSI module being modeled. Where a computer data base exists, or is created as part of the design process, it can be used as the source of personalization. The information needed for eve...