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Browse Prior Art Database

Using Fusible Links to Apply Machine Readable Serial Numbers to Printed Circuit Boards

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089533D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Wahler, RD: AUTHOR

Abstract

It is necessary to enter the serial number of a printed-circuit board assembly into the board tester prior to the actual testing. This is required for production control, failure analysis, and to insure that the board receives the proper test sequence. In a normal, low-volume testing situation, this number is printed on the board in ink by a sequential numbering machine and manually entered into the tester by the operator using a keyboard.

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Using Fusible Links to Apply Machine Readable Serial Numbers to Printed Circuit Boards

It is necessary to enter the serial number of a printed-circuit board assembly into the board tester prior to the actual testing. This is required for production control, failure analysis, and to insure that the board receives the proper test sequence. In a normal, low-volume testing situation, this number is printed on the board in ink by a sequential numbering machine and manually entered into the tester by the operator using a keyboard.

Circuit board artwork may be altered so that the pattern shown in the figure would be etched onto each board. The narrow sections of the land patterns would serve as fusible links, and could be blown cleanly by forcing them to conduct large currents (1-5 amps) for short periods of time. Note that the common side of these links could be an existing land pattern which would not be damaged during the serial numbering operation. The sequencer would number the boards by blowing these links so that the serial number would be presented in binary code (a blown link representing a 1). Again, note from the figure that the digital number weights would be etched over the fusible links to aid in visually reading the number. It would also be possible to code the links in binary coded decimal although more links would then be required.

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