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Interchangeable Keybutton Group Assembly

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089577D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 21K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Campbell, RE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In modern electronic keyboard assemblies, there often exists the requirement to replace the keybuttons with a different array of nomenclature buttons without changing the electronic mechanisms underlying the keybuttons or to which the keybuttons are attached. A variety of key actuators or electronic switches are utilized, and the general approach has been to replace the keybutton tops. This means that individual printed, engraved or similarly marked keybuttons with the desired nomenclature on them must be sorted out and laboriously replaced one by one on existing assemblies. Also, during the initial manufacture of such keyboards, a similar step must be taken where bins or boxes of different nomenclature buttons must be sorted through to select the desired subset of nomenclature buttons for application to a given keyboard.

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Interchangeable Keybutton Group Assembly

In modern electronic keyboard assemblies, there often exists the requirement to replace the keybuttons with a different array of nomenclature buttons without changing the electronic mechanisms underlying the keybuttons or to which the keybuttons are attached. A variety of key actuators or electronic switches are utilized, and the general approach has been to replace the keybutton tops. This means that individual printed, engraved or similarly marked keybuttons with the desired nomenclature on them must be sorted out and laboriously replaced one by one on existing assemblies. Also, during the initial manufacture of such keyboards, a similar step must be taken where bins or boxes of different nomenclature buttons must be sorted through to select the desired subset of nomenclature buttons for application to a given keyboard.

The figure shows a method in which an entire assembly of various keybuttons can be handled as a single unit and all of the buttons on a keyboard replaced in one operation. This method makes use of two existing elements. The first is the keyboard contamination shield 1 which is made of flexible neoprene, rubber, plastic or similar material that overlies t~e key actuator modules to prevent the entry of dust and moisture. The second element is the keybutton array 2 of which two are shown, but many more could exist on a given keyboard. Usually the key actuators (not shown) lie underneath the contamination shi...