Browse Prior Art Database

Laser Print Head Employing a Plurality of Lasers Per Channel

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089609D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Crow, JD: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article discloses an optical converter for channeling GaAs lasers into a closely packed output beam useful in laser transfer printing. The apparatus channels the lasers into a closely packed output beam to increase the laser power per unit length, while minimizing losses and providing efficient heat sinking with a consequent increase in printing speeds.

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Laser Print Head Employing a Plurality of Lasers Per Channel

This article discloses an optical converter for channeling GaAs lasers into a closely packed output beam useful in laser transfer printing. The apparatus channels the lasers into a closely packed output beam to increase the laser power per unit length, while minimizing losses and providing efficient heat sinking with a consequent increase in printing speeds.

In the plan and side views, the GaAs lasers 10A, 10B and 10C, along with similar groups 11A-11C and 12A-12C, are all mounted on a common heat sink
13. While three lasers are shown, the number is illustrative and limited only by the size of the individual lasers and the optical constraints of the coupling apparatus. The number of lasers determines the effective power at the output.

Each group of lasers is coupled to one of the optical fibers 14, 15, 16 by a tapered optical waveguide section 17, 18, 19, respectively, formed in a common substrate 20. The optical fibers are laid in V-shaped grooves in the substrate 20 so as to provide the accurate alignment of each fiber with its corresponding tapered waveguide section.

The individual optical fibers are convergently grouped in a slotted wafer 21 in a linear array for focusing by lens 22 to the recording medium 23. These wafers may be stacked to provide a printing matrix.

The substrate 20 perferably employs silicon, although other material, such as Al(2)O(3) or copper, may be employed. It is preferential...