Browse Prior Art Database

Distributed Blowing Engine for Electronic Cooling

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089610D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 3 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Stuckert, PE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Assume a cooling scheme in which the motive power which drives air through a duct is provided by a tube with nozzles located at one end of the duct. This tube can be considered a "concentrated" blowing engine. There is described herein an alternative spooling scheme in which the motive power is provided by nozzles which are located at a multiplicity of locations within the duct, i.e., a "distributed" blowing engine.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Page 1 of 3

Distributed Blowing Engine for Electronic Cooling

Assume a cooling scheme in which the motive power which drives air through a duct is provided by a tube with nozzles located at one end of the duct. This tube can be considered a "concentrated" blowing engine. There is described herein an alternative spooling scheme in which the motive power is provided by nozzles which are located at a multiplicity of locations within the duct, i.e., a "distributed" blowing engine.

The cooling scheme described above as a "concentrated" blowing engine is particularly adapted to cooling electronic circuitry when the requirement is that all elements be maintained at or below a specified maximum temperature. Frequently, other requirements exist: (a) that all elements be maintained at temperatures which are between specified maximum and minimum temperatures or (b) that the temperature at which the hottest element is maintained and the temperature at which the coolest element is maintained shall not exceed a specified temperature difference. In such cases cooling with a concentrated blowing engine may not be satisfactory because of the differences in air velocity and turbulence at various locations in the duct. Distributed blowing engines reduce differences in velocity and turbulence in the duct and, thus, provide more uniform cooling.

Throughout the following description the details of nozzle design or form (e.g., holes or slits) are not considered; when shown in the figures, nozzles are represented as cylindrical holes or tubes. A tube with a row of nozzles is represented by the symbol shown in Fig. 1. Each of the nozzles N blow in the direction of the arrows. P is a source of pressurized air. Various types of distributed blowing engines ar...