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Browse Prior Art Database

Step Motor Stabilizing Control

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089692D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 26K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Barcomb, JG: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The velocity regulation of a step motor, particularly a linear step motor, can be improved by using increased drive voltage or a pedestal voltage for selected ones of the motor advance pulses. In some applications, the motor load may change with direction or during advance so that its velocity will vary. The application of selected pedestal voltages increases drive currents sufficiently to aid in stabilizing the motor speed and achieving the required positioning accuracy. An example of control algorithm pulses is given in the figure for acceleration, constant run and deceleration.

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Step Motor Stabilizing Control

The velocity regulation of a step motor, particularly a linear step motor, can be improved by using increased drive voltage or a pedestal voltage for selected ones of the motor advance pulses. In some applications, the motor load may change with direction or during advance so that its velocity will vary. The application of selected pedestal voltages increases drive currents sufficiently to aid in stabilizing the motor speed and achieving the required positioning accuracy. An example of control algorithm pulses is given in the figure for acceleration, constant run and deceleration.

This technique produces a nonlinear torque. When the motor is going too fast, the torque which causes the motor to slow down is higher than the torque which exists to speed up the motor when the motor is going too slow. This technique is applicable to both rotary or linear stepper motors.

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