Browse Prior Art Database

LSI Chip Design for Ease of Engineering Change

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089693D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jumbeck, GI: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A large-scale integrated (LSI) chip may consist of many hundreds of circuits which quite often require changes due to engineering debugs, subsequent problems involved in implementation, etc. The turnaround time for making changes in such LSI chips is in the order of months, rather than days, as with previous semiconductor technologies. This long turnaround time can be reduced significantly by using a basically designed LSI chip and then, in addition, having multiple chip releases which can be made utilizing certain portions of the initially designed chip and eliminating other portions of the chip.

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LSI Chip Design for Ease of Engineering Change

A large-scale integrated (LSI) chip may consist of many hundreds of circuits which quite often require changes due to engineering debugs, subsequent problems involved in implementation, etc. The turnaround time for making changes in such LSI chips is in the order of months, rather than days, as with previous semiconductor technologies. This long turnaround time can be reduced significantly by using a basically designed LSI chip and then, in addition, having multiple chip releases which can be made utilizing certain portions of the initially designed chip and eliminating other portions of the chip.

This is illustrated in the figure, which for simplicity illustrates an LSI chip as containing three defined portions A, B and C. This would represent the initial LSI design of the chip. When a change is required, the original chip may be removed and a partial chip (without the affected area) is placed onto the original chip site of the module. The changed area of the chip is emulated by way of external circuitry which allows the chip function to be completed and the system to become operational even though there has not been a total reimplementation of the LSI chip design. As shown in the figure, there can be at least three permutations of the basic design with the required external circuitry to replace the affected portion of the chip not used.

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