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Polishing Soft Metals

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089759D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Klepeis, SJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

In fatigue analysis of metals, it is often helpful to study grain formations and boundaries. If grain boundaries are to be studied optically, it is often necessary to polish the metal surface.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

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Polishing Soft Metals

In fatigue analysis of metals, it is often helpful to study grain formations and boundaries. If grain boundaries are to be studied optically, it is often necessary to polish the metal surface.

The following method is particularly useful for polishing soft metal alloys (for example, lead/indium alloys) so that grain boundaries may be seen. 1. Bake sample (for example, for 16 hours at 125 Degrees C) to homogenize the material. 2. Polish the sample using a 100-mesh diamond wheel. 3. Polish the sample using a 15-micron wheel to polish out the deeper cracks caused by the preceding wheel. 4. Using a cloth (for example, DuPont cloth number 404-4035- 404-0030 blue without adhesive backing) and BRASSO*, polish until the BRASSO turns black. 5. Continue polishing under running water, with occasional visual inspection, until desired luster is obtained. 6. If luster reverses to dullness, add BRASSO and continue until desired luster is reached. * Trademark of R. T. French Company, Rochester, New York

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