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Convection Cooling Apparatus

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089762D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Damm, EP: AUTHOR

Abstract

Convection cooling apparatus is provided which is capable of cooling high performance LSI (large-scale integrated) circuits. This arrangement avoids the inherent problems encountered in air cooling, such as noise and air flow paths. Also, the problems encountered with immersion in a dielectric fluid, such as corrosion and large bubble nucleation, are avoided. Furthermore, unlike most liquid cooling schemes where problems, such as corrosion, are insidious, defects, such as leaks, are factory detectable prior to shipping.

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Convection Cooling Apparatus

Convection cooling apparatus is provided which is capable of cooling high performance LSI (large-scale integrated) circuits. This arrangement avoids the inherent problems encountered in air cooling, such as noise and air flow paths. Also, the problems encountered with immersion in a dielectric fluid, such as corrosion and large bubble nucleation, are avoided. Furthermore, unlike most liquid cooling schemes where problems, such as corrosion, are insidious, defects, such as leaks, are factory detectable prior to shipping.

A plastic chamber 10 is cemented to the back of a chip 12 to be cooled and interconnected via a series of small plastic tubes 14 to a circulating pump. Of course, this chamber can be connected in series with other similar chambers, if desired. Since the liquid coolant 16 only comes in contact with the back side 18 of the chip 12, water, which is an extremely good heat transfer fluid, can be used.

The mechanical force problems for the chip 12 would need to be held to some low value. A few chips, probably not more than 5 or 10, could be connected in series. Thus, 10 or 20 parallel cooling paths, depending on the number of chips to be cooled, would be present.

Common epoxy cements 20 could be used for making the joints between the chip 12 and the chamber 10, thus providing a relatively inexpensive, highly efficient chip cooling system. Of course, a pump, heat exchanger and expansion tank would have to be provided to compl...