Browse Prior Art Database

Curved Keyboard

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089774D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Harris, RH: AUTHOR

Abstract

It is well known in keyboard designs that the profile or geometry of the arrangement of keytops relative to an operators hand should have an effective dish or curved shape to enhance the operator's ease of access and feel for the keytops. A flat, slanted keyboard having key buttons of identical shape and identical keytop orientation may cause operator discomfort because of the lack of any curved or dishing effect produced along the various planes of the keytops.

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Curved Keyboard

It is well known in keyboard designs that the profile or geometry of the arrangement of keytops relative to an operators hand should have an effective dish or curved shape to enhance the operator's ease of access and feel for the keytops. A flat, slanted keyboard having key buttons of identical shape and identical keytop orientation may cause operator discomfort because of the lack of any curved or dishing effect produced along the various planes of the keytops.

This problem has been alleviated in prior designs by using individually shaped key buttons or keystems which vary as to the slant and degree of slope molded into the top of the key buttons by the row in which they are used in the assembled keyboard. This approach creates the desirable dished or curved effect for the operator. It also creates an assembly problem, since individual key buttons or keystems must be designed for each row where they are intended to be used. This fact, combined with the wide variety of font and key top designations which are required, multiplies the inventory of marked key button tops appreciably and complicates the assembly process by requiring careful selection among several keytops with the same nomenclature on them depending on the row in the keyboard in which they are to be used.

The figure illustrates another solution to the problem in which the desirable dished or curved profile is created, not by altering the keytop design, but by bending the entire keyboard itself to create the curved keytop orientation. By this approach, the key buttons may all be of the same cross section and slant, and only the nomenclature need b...