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Making Objects With Refractory Glasses

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089815D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Takamori, T: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a method which is useful for making alkali resistant containers which, for example, may be used in ink jet printing systems. Alkali-resistant glasses all contain significant amounts (as one of the major components) of ZrO(2), which makes the glasses highly viscous, even at the temperatures at which most of the technical glasses can be fined (1400-1600 degrees C). These glasses, therefore, have to be melted at a much higher temperature than the temperatures at which, for example, a platinum crucible can be used. Often precious metal alloys are used for the crucibles which are more fragile and expensive, and in other cases special refractory crucibles are used which are always a source of contamination.

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Making Objects With Refractory Glasses

This article describes a method which is useful for making alkali resistant containers which, for example, may be used in ink jet printing systems. Alkali- resistant glasses all contain significant amounts (as one of the major components) of ZrO(2), which makes the glasses highly viscous, even at the temperatures at which most of the technical glasses can be fined (1400-1600 degrees C). These glasses, therefore, have to be melted at a much higher temperature than the temperatures at which, for example, a platinum crucible can be used. Often precious metal alloys are used for the crucibles which are more fragile and expensive, and in other cases special refractory crucibles are used which are always a source of contamination. When one attempts to melt a significant amount of glass in these crucibles, heating and fining, and then forming of the molten glass are other difficulties always encountered. Only special, very expensive equipment can solve most of the problems. However, as long as one stays with the melting of the glass in crucibles, there is always a limit to the maximum temperature to be reached by the choice of crucible materials and/or heating methods.

The following method practically eliminates most of these limiting factors in developing new alkali-resistant glasses, thus inevitably refractory, by eliminating the conventional crucible melting of the glass. The method consists of the following procedures: 1. The glass batch is weighed and mixed well during usual glass batch preparation. 2. The glass batch is then cold-pressed to form a pellet or any other bulky shape. If necessary, the batch is calcined before the pressing.
3. The pressed...