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Volume Controlled Film Growth by Liquid Phase Epitaxy

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089835D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Geiss, EA: AUTHOR

Abstract

Liquid phase epitaxy is a process that is commonly used for the fabrication of magnetic bubble domain films. For example, magnetic garnet films are often grown by this process on nonmagnetic garnet substrates. In such a process, it is important that the thickness of the bubble domain film be accurately controlled over the entire wafer. This is especially important if very thin bubble domain films are used.

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Volume Controlled Film Growth by Liquid Phase Epitaxy

Liquid phase epitaxy is a process that is commonly used for the fabrication of magnetic bubble domain films. For example, magnetic garnet films are often grown by this process on nonmagnetic garnet substrates. In such a process, it is important that the thickness of the bubble domain film be accurately controlled over the entire wafer. This is especially important if very thin bubble domain films are used.

To insure controlled film thickness, the present technique uses a controlled volume of solution in contact with the substrate surface. A pair or a multiplicity of substrates is arranged face-to-face where the distance between adjacent substrate surfaces is precisely con-trolled. Such control can be conveniently provided by spacers or shims of about 0.02-inch thickness. Platinum is a suitable material for the spacers. Essentially, the substrates are sufficiently close to one another that a solution located in contact with the substrate surfaces will be entrapped by surface tension.

For liquid phase epitaxy, the closely spaced substrate array is dipped into a solution saturated with nutrient which is to be epitaxial deposited on the substrate surfaces. When the array is withdrawn from the melt, the solution occupying the limited volume space between the substrates is entrapped by surface tension. When the array is subsequently cooled to room temperature at a controlled rate to complete epitaxial growth, the fi...