Browse Prior Art Database

Terminal for Kanji Characters

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089836D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lean, EG: AUTHOR

Abstract

A data processing terminal employing Kanji characters advantageously utilizes a photographic storage medium and optical fiber techniques to provide a simple storage and control apparatus for the generation, display and printing of Kanji characters, which in a typical installation would exceed 8,000 characters.

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Terminal for Kanji Characters

A data processing terminal employing Kanji characters advantageously utilizes a photographic storage medium and optical fiber techniques to provide a simple storage and control apparatus for the generation, display and printing of Kanji characters, which in a typical installation would exceed 8,000 characters.

As shown in the drawing, a rotating drum (or disk) contains a micro transparency of every needed Kanji character, typically recorded in eight rows of 1200 characters each for a total of 9600 characters. Also recorded on the drum in registration with the character images are photographically recorded binary coded marks corresponding to the characters. For 9600 characters a 14-bit word will suffice to locate each of the images, for example, three bits identifying the track and 11 bits for the angular position.

Opposite each of the eight Kanji tracks is an individual light-emitting diode (LED) which is potentialized at the appropriate angular position to select the character. A thin slit and a linear array of optical fibers (typically 40 per track) opposite each track provides multichannel image dissection of the character, which together with a further strobing of the light source or gating of the photodetectors to which the fibers are bundled provide a matrix of electrical pulses (40 x 40, for example) for entry into the buffer storage, character by character, until the requisite number of lines is stored to constitute a page.

The coded index marks can be employed to address the rotating drum for image selection...