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Electrolytic Machining of Ink Jet Nozzles

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089841D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Keyes, RW: AUTHOR

Abstract

Holes with a diameter less than 1 mil can be etched through semiconductor wafers. The basic idea is that an electrolyte is confined within a thin tube which limits its action to a small area. The rate of etching can be controlled by the current passed through the electrolyte. Thus, the hole need not have uniform diameter throughout, but can be given a desirable profile.

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Electrolytic Machining of Ink Jet Nozzles

Holes with a diameter less than 1 mil can be etched through semiconductor wafers. The basic idea is that an electrolyte is confined within a thin tube which limits its action to a small area. The rate of etching can be controlled by the current passed through the electrolyte. Thus, the hole need not have uniform diameter throughout, but can be given a desirable profile.

This method may be used to fabricate arrays of ink jet nozzles. The nozzles can, of course, be drilled sequentially one at a time. Preferably, however, they are drilled by a tool 2 comprised of a holder 4 and a number of tubular tips 6, 8 and 10, each containing an electrolyte 14, and which are precisely positioned with respect to one another, as shown in the figure. The current supplied to the tool 2 from a source (not shown) can be varied as the tool 2 advances through the workpiece 12 to produce an optimized hydrodynamic profile. The current to each tip can be individually controlled, if necessary, to achieve uniformity.

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