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Direct Circuit Deposition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089897D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bakos, P: AUTHOR

Abstract

Multilayered integrated circuitry is prepared in the following manner. A substrate is activated by suspending the same in a PdCl(2) solution for about five minutes. The activated substrate is then dip-coated in a photoresist, for example, KPR* or neoprene photoresist, baked, exposed to actinic radiation through a glass master and is developed to obtain a photo-image. The substrate and its image are activated by placing the substrate in a SnCl(2) sensitizer solution for about eight minutes. The activated areas of the substrate are then metalized by suspending the substrate in an electroless plating bath for about twenty minutes so that a metal, for example, copper, can be deposited on the sensitized areas. Additional circuitry is obtained by repeating the above sequence of steps until several layers of circuits are obtained.

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Direct Circuit Deposition

Multilayered integrated circuitry is prepared in the following manner. A substrate is activated by suspending the same in a PdCl(2) solution for about five minutes. The activated substrate is then dip-coated in a photoresist, for example, KPR* or neoprene photoresist, baked, exposed to actinic radiation through a glass master and is developed to obtain a photo-image. The substrate and its image are activated by placing the substrate in a SnCl(2) sensitizer solution for about eight minutes. The activated areas of the substrate are then metalized by suspending the substrate in an electroless plating bath for about twenty minutes so that a metal, for example, copper, can be deposited on the sensitized areas. Additional circuitry is obtained by repeating the above sequence of steps until several layers of circuits are obtained. The method provides for the elimination of etching, laminating, and soldering. *Trademark of Eastman Kodak Co.

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