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Rotary Scintillation Image Scanner

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089942D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chaapel, DW: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In the field of medical diagnostics, it is a practice to use radionuclides, injected into a patient, so as to observe the nature of bodily functions. The radiations from the radionuclides are detectable by this scintillation image scanner. Such employs a rotary motion scanning assembly having an adjustable collimator 10 made of several lead brackets 12, each having a plurality of collimator holes 14 along its length. The center of each hole 14 on one bracket 12 is in line with the center of holes on other such brackets. The tapered collimator tubes formed by in-line holes are a departure from focusing collimators. Individual tapered-hole collimators improve attainable accuracy and focal depth but require intense dosage of rapid decay radionuclides which has become feasible.

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Rotary Scintillation Image Scanner

In the field of medical diagnostics, it is a practice to use radionuclides, injected into a patient, so as to observe the nature of bodily functions. The radiations from the radionuclides are detectable by this scintillation image scanner. Such employs a rotary motion scanning assembly having an adjustable collimator 10 made of several lead brackets 12, each having a plurality of collimator holes 14 along its length. The center of each hole 14 on one bracket 12 is in line with the center of holes on other such brackets. The tapered collimator tubes formed by in-line holes are a departure from focusing collimators. Individual tapered-hole collimators improve attainable accuracy and focal depth but require intense dosage of rapid decay radionuclides which has become feasible.

Each collimator tube is in line with a crystal 16. When radioactive radiations strike crystal 16, visible light is emitted by such crystal and detected by photomultiplier 18. Since the amount of light emitted within crystal 16 is a function of the amount of radiation striking the crystal, the output voltage of photomultiplier 18 is proportional to the radiation detected by crystal 16. In order to prevent stray radiation from being detected by the crystal, photomultiplier tube combination, lead shielding 20 is placed around the crystals so as to prevent spurious radiations from causing an output voltage from photomultipliers 18.

The motor and gears 22 are conn...