Browse Prior Art Database

Computer Control of Fluid Flow

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089960D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Boerger, FE: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The system is for regulating and controlling gas or liquid flow via a closed-loop interaction of fluid flow elements and a computing system. The basic elements are digital computing system 1, current-to-air or voltage-to-air transducer 2, pressure regulator 3 with supplementary air-loading port, electronic pressure transducer 4 with voltage or current output, and adjustable needle valve 5.

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Computer Control of Fluid Flow

The system is for regulating and controlling gas or liquid flow via a closed- loop interaction of fluid flow elements and a computing system. The basic elements are digital computing system 1, current-to-air or voltage-to-air transducer 2, pressure regulator 3 with supplementary air-loading port, electronic pressure transducer 4 with voltage or current output, and adjustable needle valve


5.

In operation, full flow is initiated by either manually opening regulator 3 if valve 5 is already open, or by opening valve 5 if regulator 3 is already open, or by opening both regulator 3 and valve 5 in any sequence. When both regulator 3 and valve 5 are opened, fluid from a suitable supply line flows through conduit 6 and into point B. The flow rate of the fluid at point B can be changed by either increasing the upstream pressure at point A by manual operation of regulator 3 or by suitable adjustment of valve 5 only, or by adjusting both regulator 3 and valve 5 in any sequence.

The proper utilization of the closed-loop system requires that changes in fluid rate at point B be accomplished by suitable adjustments on the fluid pressure at point A. Ideally, the pressure at point A is first set at a value corresponding to the midrange of flow rates required at point B, or at the exact value of the flow required at point B. Since the flow at point B is a function of the pressure drop across valve 5, for a fixed setting, any changes in pressure at point A alters the flow rate at point B. Therefore, it is possible to relate, via a calibration curve, pressure at point A to flow rate at point B. Once a pressure-flow relationship is established with valve 5, at a fixed setting, the system is able to operate in a closed loop. The pressure at point A is monitored by transducer 4.

Ideally, the best operat...