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Optical Correlation and Heterodyne Detection of Compressed Pulses

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000089993D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lean, EG: AUTHOR

Abstract

In order to provide a solution for the conflicting requirements of simultaneous long-range and high-resolution performance in radar systems, the techniques of chirp radar for transmitting linear FM pulses and a matched filter to compress the received signal pulses in time are available using optical pulse compression techniques by acoustic Bragg diffraction fraction in microwave frequencies. In principle, the techniques have compression ratios up to 1000, large absolute bandwidth available, e.g., as high as 1000 Mnz bandwidth, and a good signal-to-noise ratio. The major limitation of such techniques is the detection method of the compressed pulse, which consists of a fine slit in front of a photomultiplier.

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Optical Correlation and Heterodyne Detection of Compressed Pulses

In order to provide a solution for the conflicting requirements of simultaneous long-range and high-resolution performance in radar systems, the techniques of chirp radar for transmitting linear FM pulses and a matched filter to compress the received signal pulses in time are available using optical pulse compression techniques by acoustic Bragg diffraction fraction in microwave frequencies. In principle, the techniques have compression ratios up to 1000, large absolute bandwidth available, e.g., as high as 1000 Mnz bandwidth, and a good signal-to- noise ratio. The major limitation of such techniques is the detection method of the compressed pulse, which consists of a fine slit in front of a photomultiplier.

In order to resolve the true pulse width, the slit has to be much smaller than the pulse width and is difficult to fabricate. At the same time, the slit cannot be too small since the intensity of the signal is proportional to the slit width. Also, a photomultiplier having the advantage of high current gain is required after the slit to display the video output signal. Ordinary photomultipliers have bandwidth limitations. This method of optical correlation and heterodyne detection of compressed pulses by acoustic Bragg diffraction solves the difficulties of the ordinary detection in addition to having other advantages.

The system in drawing A consists of two sets of acoustic Bragg diffraction de...