Browse Prior Art Database

Visual Audio Control System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090048D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lourie, JR: AUTHOR

Abstract

A computer program is employed to prepare punched paper tape. The latter by its pattern of holes, is able to control the advancing movements of multiple slide projectors, e.g., carousel projectors, and the production of accompanying sound effects such as tones simulating rhythmic drum beats.

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Visual Audio Control System

A computer program is employed to prepare punched paper tape. The latter by its pattern of holes, is able to control the advancing movements of multiple slide projectors, e.g., carousel projectors, and the production of accompanying sound effects such as tones simulating rhythmic drum beats.

The control tape produced by the program is an eight-channel paper tape as at A. The first six channels respectively control the advancing movements of six projectors such as the one at B. The seventh tape channel performs the function of turning the projectors and audio equipment on and off. The eighth tape channel is used to provide sound without visual change in certain instances. A hole in a given projector channel, i.e., one of the tape channels 1...6, causes its respective projector to advance and also causes an audible beat to be emitted by the sound equipment. The projectors are advanced in specified rhythms so that the slides appear to be changing in time to drum beats. Holes in different channels can cause different frequencies of tones to be emitted by the sound equipment, resulting in a variety of rhythmic interpretations.

The available rhythms are recorded in data cards, i.e., rhythm library cards, as at C. Each card in the rhythm library defines a particular rhythm by a string of 1's and 0's, as well as defining the length of the measure and the time signature. Other data cards, i.e., rhythm program cards, store certain additional information needed in the preparation of the control tape. In preparing these rhythm program cards, the standard metronome marking, MM = 60, is assumed unless otherwise specified.

The audio-visual control program generates a punched paper tape from the rh...