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High Speed Beam Addressable Recording System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090099D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brown, AV: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This beam-addressable recording system requires no subsequent information development step. The memory element to be utilized in this high-speed recording and reading method is formed from a thin layer of metal with a given reflectivity-wavelength characteristic formed on top of a base metal which has a different reflectivity-wavelength characteristic. Using an electron beam or an optical beam, the top layer and a portion of the bottom layer are raised to a temperature equal to the higher melting point of the two materials. As a result, the top layer dissolves into the bottom layer and its original and unique reflectivity is changed. This step can be characterized as writing a binary 1 for example. The appearance of an unchanged reflectivity-wavelength characteristic at any address can be indicative of a binary 0 for example.

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High Speed Beam Addressable Recording System

This beam-addressable recording system requires no subsequent information development step. The memory element to be utilized in this high- speed recording and reading method is formed from a thin layer of metal with a given reflectivity-wavelength characteristic formed on top of a base metal which has a different reflectivity-wavelength characteristic. Using an electron beam or an optical beam, the top layer and a portion of the bottom layer are raised to a temperature equal to the higher melting point of the two materials. As a result, the top layer dissolves into the bottom layer and its original and unique reflectivity is changed. This step can be characterized as writing a binary 1 for example. The appearance of an unchanged reflectivity-wavelength characteristic at any address can be indicative of a binary 0 for example. After the memory is written into to store desired information, a spot of light, for instance from a cathode ray tube, is scanned across the surface of the memory. If the wavelength of the scanned spot is such as to clearly pick up the difference in reflectivity of the two layers, the information initially written can be read as binary 1's and 0's distinguishable one from the other. The arrangement has writing speeds which are ten times faster than conventional techniques since a diffusion of one metal into the other rather than punch-through of the material is utilized.

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