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Regulated Power Supply

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090149D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Caulfield, TM: AUTHOR

Abstract

This high programming speed power supply is capable of slewing rates in excess of 10,000 volts per second. It provides a programmable regulated voltage to a load regardless of the load phase angle. The basic supply comprises a transformer and full-wave rectifier power source 1 with primary storage capacitor 8, and a linear and nonlinear regulator.

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Regulated Power Supply

This high programming speed power supply is capable of slewing rates in excess of 10,000 volts per second. It provides a programmable regulated voltage to a load regardless of the load phase angle. The basic supply comprises a transformer and full-wave rectifier power source 1 with primary storage capacitor 8, and a linear and nonlinear regulator.

The linear regulator is a closed-loop system comprising a pass transistor 5, error sensing circuit 3 with programming resistor 11, error amplifier 2, and an output storage capacitor 9. The linear regulator is used to control output voltage changes of less than two volts.

The nonlinear regulator comprises two switch transistors 6 and 7 to rapidly build up or dump the output voltage, and a sense amplifier-driver 4, 11, and 12. When amplifier 4 detects that an output voltage change of greater than two volts is required, it turns on one of the two switch transistors 6 and 7 to effect that change. When the output voltage comes within two volts of the desired or new programmed value, the switch transistor in operation is turned off. The linear regulator then drives the output voltage to the programmed value.

Amplifier 4 detects an output voltage error at greater than two volts by comparing the fixed voltages on the emitters of detector transistors 13 and 14 to the voltage at the output of the amplifier 2. If the output voltage requires an increase greater than two volts, build-up driver 11 and transisto...