Browse Prior Art Database

Multiple Exposure Technique

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090170D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hymes, IM: AUTHOR

Abstract

A single hologram is subdivided by being cut up to form a number of smaller holograms, each of which can serve as a master for reproducing the whole original image. In these small holograms, definition is degraded more and more as the number of subdivisions increase, while the depth of field increases. This corresponds to the reduction of apertures in lens systems, such as photographic lenses and microscope objectives. Practical applications of this method require taking into account the degree of definition required. The small holograms produced can also be further multiplied by photographic contact printing, with only the slight impairment of quality expected in conventional photographic contact printing.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Multiple Exposure Technique

A single hologram is subdivided by being cut up to form a number of smaller holograms, each of which can serve as a master for reproducing the whole original image. In these small holograms, definition is degraded more and more as the number of subdivisions increase, while the depth of field increases. This corresponds to the reduction of apertures in lens systems, such as photographic lenses and microscope objectives. Practical applications of this method require taking into account the degree of definition required.

The small holograms produced can also be further multiplied by photographic contact printing, with only the slight impairment of quality expected in conventional photographic contact printing. As described in Scientific American, June 1965, Page 24, the information on the film is in the form of a modulated spatial carrier. Contact printing only reverses the polarity of the carrier. Thus, the images formed by such contact printing are also positives, indistinguishable from the master used except for the slight reduction in quality expected in photographic contact printing.

1