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Thin Film Fabrication

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090210D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brownlow, JM: AUTHOR

Abstract

The anisotropy field H(k) in thin-film memory devices is controlled without an associated increase in dispersion, alpha(90). Previously H(k) is lowered by deposition of the film material in an applied rotating field. In this previous method, the dispersion increases in proportion to the lowering of the anisotropy field. The anisotropy field is reduced in a controlled manner by electroplating the magnetic material using a pulse plating technique in the presence of an applied field. The film is deposited in thickness from 100 angstroms to 250 angstroms during each current pulse. The applied field is switched 90 degrees between pulses to produce a layered structure having an alternation of easy directions 90 degrees apart. Other layer ratios and angles of rotation can be used.

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Thin Film Fabrication

The anisotropy field H(k) in thin-film memory devices is controlled without an associated increase in dispersion, alpha(90). Previously H(k) is lowered by deposition of the film material in an applied rotating field. In this previous method, the dispersion increases in proportion to the lowering of the anisotropy field. The anisotropy field is reduced in a controlled manner by electroplating the magnetic material using a pulse plating technique in the presence of an applied field. The film is deposited in thickness from 100 angstroms to 250 angstroms during each current pulse. The applied field is switched 90 degrees between pulses to produce a layered structure having an alternation of easy directions 90 degrees apart. Other layer ratios and angles of rotation can be used. A thermal treatment in an applied field is used to stabilize the anisotropy in those layers parallel to the applied annealing field. The alternate layers having easy directions initially at 90 degrees to the anneal field are reduced in anisotropy, i.e., approaches zero. The resultant anisotropy of the layered film is a linear function of the two anisotropies and the thickness ratio between the two types of layers. The dispersion stays within acceptable limits.

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