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Josephson Junction Circuit

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090211D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 20K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lasher, GJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

A Josephson junction when connected in series with resistor R and voltage source V, is a bistable device in the sense that it can operate in either of two steady states. In the DC state, the potential drop across the Josephson junction is zero and a steady current flows through the junction whose value is V/R. In the AC state, the current and voltage have alternating components and there is an average potential drop across the Josephson junction, and an average current that is smaller than the average current in the DC state. The bistable behavior of a Josephson junction is improved by imbedding a Josephson junction 2 in a tin strip line 4 in which both ends 6 and 8 are terminated with the characteristic impedance Z of the strip line so that no reflected signal returns to junction 2 due to its own AC emission.

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Josephson Junction Circuit

A Josephson junction when connected in series with resistor R and voltage source V, is a bistable device in the sense that it can operate in either of two steady states. In the DC state, the potential drop across the Josephson junction is zero and a steady current flows through the junction whose value is V/R. In the AC state, the current and voltage have alternating components and there is an average potential drop across the Josephson junction, and an average current that is smaller than the average current in the DC state. The bistable behavior of a Josephson junction is improved by imbedding a Josephson junction 2 in a tin strip line 4 in which both ends 6 and 8 are terminated with the characteristic impedance Z of the strip line so that no reflected signal returns to junction 2 due to its own AC emission. Strip line 4, in effect, serves as a part of a damping circuit so that the DC bistable operation of the junction, namely, state 1, corresponding to zero voltage and state 2, corresponding to a nonzero voltage, can be reproducibly and uniformly attained.

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