Browse Prior Art Database

Analog Optical Input Terminal

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090251D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Betts, P: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This disclosure relates to a data matrix or photodetecting area which is defined by a rectangular path which is continually traversed by two mirrors 3. The latter are mounted on flexible belt 1 that is driven through the rectangular path by four rectangularly positioned cylindrical pulley members 2. Two rectangularly disposed stationary mirrors 4 are mounted within the travel of belt 1 and parallel to two adjacent sides of this travel. As mirrors 3 move down one side of the rectangle, light from light source 9 passes through lens 10, is reflected by the moving mirror 3 to the stationary mirror 4 which reflects it back against the moving mirror 3 to another stationary mirror 11 which reflects the light to photodetector 12.

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Analog Optical Input Terminal

This disclosure relates to a data matrix or photodetecting area which is defined by a rectangular path which is continually traversed by two mirrors 3. The latter are mounted on flexible belt 1 that is driven through the rectangular path by four rectangularly positioned cylindrical pulley members 2. Two rectangularly disposed stationary mirrors 4 are mounted within the travel of belt 1 and parallel to two adjacent sides of this travel. As mirrors 3 move down one side of the rectangle, light from light source 9 passes through lens 10, is reflected by the moving mirror 3 to the stationary mirror 4 which reflects it back against the moving mirror 3 to another stationary mirror 11 which reflects the light to photodetector 12.

As mirrors 3 pass along the next side of the rectangular path, light is reflected from light source 5, through lens 6, reflected by the moving mirror 3 to the stationary mirror 4. The latter then reflects the light back to the same moving mirror 3 which then reflects the light to mirror 7 which, in turn, reflects the light to photodetector 8. Thus, it is seen that, by moving the mirror along these two adjacent legs of the rectangular path, the photodetectors 8 and 12 will indicate the presence of any object within the X-Y coordinates defined by the moving rectangular path of the mirrors 3.

Suitable clocking indicia on the belt 1 are employed to identify the position of mirrors 3.

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