Browse Prior Art Database

Heater Thermoswitch Protection

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090274D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Antonetti, VW: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In arrangements where forced air cooling is utilized, such as computers, the inlet air entering the blowers is usually specified within a particular temperature range. Conventional thermoswitches do not respond fast enough in the event of a blower failure to protect the components being cooled. For example, a thermoswitch responds when the ambient air in which it is located rises above the thermoswitch critical setting. The lag based on the mass of the thermoswitch. In most cases, this is too late since the rise in the temperature of the ambient air is a result of the rise in temperature of the component being protected. This device responds essentially to the blower failure combined with the rise in temperature of the ambient air.

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Heater Thermoswitch Protection

In arrangements where forced air cooling is utilized, such as computers, the inlet air entering the blowers is usually specified within a particular temperature range. Conventional thermoswitches do not respond fast enough in the event of a blower failure to protect the components being cooled. For example, a thermoswitch responds when the ambient air in which it is located rises above the thermoswitch critical setting. The lag based on the mass of the thermoswitch. In most cases, this is too late since the rise in the temperature of the ambient air is a result of the rise in temperature of the component being protected. This device responds essentially to the blower failure combined with the rise in temperature of the ambient air. The device consists of heat sink 10 preferably formed of a sheet of copper, wire-wound resistor 12, and small conventional disk-type thermoswitch 14. The three parts are bonded together using a good heat conductive epoxy. Insulator mounting block 16 is used for securing the device to the machine frame such that the heat from the device is not transmitted to the frame. Essentially, when the air flow stops, the cooling of sink 10 is diminished and therefore the heat from resistor 12 is more readily transferred to thermoswitch 14 causing its set point temperature to trigger and give an indication of the failure of the blower.

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