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Printed Circuit Deposition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090297D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Turetzky, MN: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This method is for generating and depositing circuit patterns on substrates, particularly substrates that are dimensionally unstable to solvent exposure. In multilayer ceramic technology, a pattern geometry must be imprinted on a green ceramic sheet. The green sheet is dimensionally unstable to certain solvents which prohibits the use of conventional pattern geometry techniques such as photoresist and etching of metal layers.

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Printed Circuit Deposition

This method is for generating and depositing circuit patterns on substrates, particularly substrates that are dimensionally unstable to solvent exposure. In multilayer ceramic technology, a pattern geometry must be imprinted on a green ceramic sheet. The green sheet is dimensionally unstable to certain solvents which prohibits the use of conventional pattern geometry techniques such as photoresist and etching of metal layers.

In drawing A, a thin film of a suitable polymer, e.g., polyvinyl butyral 10, is cast or otherwise formed on flexible substrate 12, typically a five mil MYLAR* sheet. Shim heights and solution concentrations are adjusted so that the dry film thickness is of the order of 0.1 mil. As in B, film 14 of a mixture of a photoresist and a conductive material is then applied over layer 10. The material can be of any conductive metal such as molybdenum trioxide. Layer 14 is then exposed to form the desired circuit pattern 16 as in C. Following a thorough drying, pattern 16, supported on substrate 12, is transferred to standard green ceramic sheet 18 as in 0. The transfer of pattern 16 is accomplished by using heat and pressure. For example, pressure on the order of 2000 psi at 60 degrees C for 10 minutes is sufficient to release pattern 16 and force it into the sheet as in E.

The technique is particularly advantageous since the circuit pattern can be substantially flush with the sheet if required. This technique also produces...