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Self Adjusting Motor Control Circuit

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090298D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Carroll, WC: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This self-correcting system is for feeding specific preselected lengths of material such as wire. The apparatus both feeds the wire and senses the length of wire fed. The feed comprises drive motor 10 and feed rollers 12 and 14. The sensing arrangement comprises peripherally perforated light chopper 20, light source 22, light conducting rods 24 and 26, photocell 28, amplifying circuit 30, and counting circuit 32. The output of counter 32 is monitored by a comparator, not shown, which stops motor 10 when a preselected count is reached.

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Self Adjusting Motor Control Circuit

This self-correcting system is for feeding specific preselected lengths of material such as wire. The apparatus both feeds the wire and senses the length of wire fed. The feed comprises drive motor 10 and feed rollers 12 and 14. The sensing arrangement comprises peripherally perforated light chopper 20, light source 22, light conducting rods 24 and 26, photocell 28, amplifying circuit 30, and counting circuit 32. The output of counter 32 is monitored by a comparator, not shown, which stops motor 10 when a preselected count is reached.

In operation, motor 10 turns feed roller 12 and chopper 20. Feed rollers 12 and 14 pull wire from the rotating spool and feed it into the cutter. Simultaneously, as chopper 20 turns, the light beam periodically activates photocell 28. Each time a perforation in chopper 20 permits light to pass to photocell 28, counter 32 receives one pulse from amplifier 30 to increase the count by one. When counter 32 receives a predetermined number of pulses, motor 10 is stopped.

Since motor 10 does not come to a dead stop at once, an overshoot of wire is paid out and a new count corresponding to the overshoot is registered on counter
32. After an initial cycle when the first length of wire is too long, counter 32 stops short of the actual length of wire paid out by the number of pulses already in such counter. The deficiency in the length of the wire is then provided by the overshoot. In addition, where the ap...