Browse Prior Art Database

Positioning Arrangement for Submicroscopic Distances

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090320D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Keyser, J: AUTHOR

Abstract

This positioning arrangement permits repetitive linear minimum distance changing of the position of an object, for example. for adjusting diaphragms, slots or mirrors, for producing and testing fine screen rasters or for positioning probes for measuring small fields of different kinds.

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Positioning Arrangement for Submicroscopic Distances

This positioning arrangement permits repetitive linear minimum distance changing of the position of an object, for example. for adjusting diaphragms, slots or mirrors, for producing and testing fine screen rasters or for positioning probes for measuring small fields of different kinds.

Pressure spring 2 acts on the free end of unilaterally clamped flexible bar 1 so that a bending stress is imposed on the latter. Adjusting device 3, for example, the spindle of a micrometer screw resting in the arrangement frame, serves as a support for spring 2. The latter has a very low spring constant in comparison with bar 1. Adjustment of device 3, acting as a support for spring 2, by delta 1 in the direction of the axis of such spring, by turning, for example, the micrometer screw, results in a new state of equilibrium in which the deflection of bar 1 is changed by f1 and the length of pressure spring 2 is reduced by f2 at delta 1 = f1 + f2. Spring deflection f and spring constant c act proportionally reversed to each other, f1/f2 = c2/c1.

Changes in the deflection of bar 1 are thus calculated as a functional of the positional changes of device 3, i.e., f1= delta 1/(1+c1/c2). Assuming, for example, c1=100 kg/cm and c2=1 kg/cm then f1= delta 1/(1+100/1) = delta 1/101, i.e., a reduction ratio of the positional changes of approximately 100:1. Thus, bar 1 can be bent around a second axis, disposed vertically in relation to the...